Welcome!
School Administrators
Benefits of "I Can Do It!"®
Manuscript Handwriting Program
Proven highly effective in
clinical studies

Utilizes research-based methods,
fully outlined in Program Manual -
Pages 484-582:
General Principles of
"I Can Do It!"
®:  Research Base &
Practical Application
(See sample pages)

Administrators, teachers, and
parents
support the use of
"I Can Do It!"
® (read comments)

Practical and goal-driven:
"I Can Do It!"
® is based upon a
long-term view of handwriting and
academic impact through high school
& college.
 

Prevention of
common problems
is a primary goal.  Methods to  
remediate poor handwriting are
included.

Fully written, easy to follow lesson
plans include short & long term
goals
that describe their practical and
functional purpose.

Activities focus on success,
function, and readability, & speed of
handwriting.

General instructional sequence
fully guides teacher in what
lessons to complete
, important as
most teachers admit they are not
adequately prepared in college to
teach handwriting. (*3)

Learning to mastery is emphasized

Memory enhancing methods are
built in.

Easy to administer, short
curriculum-based screening

directly tied to instruction.

Yes, absolutely!  

Research says:

Prediction of later academic success
can
be determined using letter formation errors.
(*16, 12)

Lower grades are earned by students with
poor handwriting  (*14,15)

A negative impact on written language
development
(compositional skill) occurs
due to handwriting difficulties (well into
teenage years) (*4)

Handwriting is directly related to
learning to compose
(*6) and is a crucial
skill for academic success
. (*16, 11)

Writing assists in developing mental
abilities
and critical thinking skills (*3, 19)

Comparable improvement in composition
has resulted as a direct result of Improving
handwriting, and explicit instruction that
enables children to write letters quickly &
accurately can increase the likelihood they
will become skilled writers. (*8, 4)

An important prerequisite to writing
complex and coherent text
is the mastery
of handwriting with quality & speed. (*4)

Students communicate their knowledge
in subject areas
using handwriting
primarily. (*6)

Handwriting is also important because
it is used for planning and as a source of
"extra memory" (*2)

High school and college students are
negatively affected by slow, illegible
handwriting. (*15)

Many high school students cannot write
with adequate speed and legibility
for
school work. (15)

Students spend over half their school
day writing
(*18)

A significant percentage of students
have handwriting problems
- 10-34%,
higher in urban areas (44%) (*13)

Special needs students can learn to
write
, if teachers realize they are capable
and expect them to learn. (9)


*See Program Manual for full list of citations.  
Some relevant & noted sources
are listed below.
* Some relevant citations: (noted above)

1.  Berninger, et. al., (1997).  Treatment of Handwriting Problems in Beginning Writers:  Transfer from Handwriting to
Composition.  
Journal of Educational Psychology, 89 (4), 652-666.
2.  Berninger (1999).  Coordinating Transcription and Text Generation in Working Memory during Composing:  Automatic and
Constructive Processes.  
Learning Disability Quarterly, 22 (2), 99-112.
3.  Bourdin & Fayol (2000), Is Graphic Activity Costly?  A Developmental Approach.  
Reading and Writing:  An Interdisciplinary
Journal,
13: 183-196.
4.  Connelly et.al., (2005).  The Slow Handwriting of Undergraduate Students Constrains Overall Performance in Exam Essay.  
Educational Psychology, 25 (1), 99-107.
5.  Graham, et. al., (2008).  
How do Primary Grade Teachers Teach Handwriting?  A National Survey.  Published online:  22 May
2007. Copyright Springer Science & Business Media B. V. 2007
Read Writ 21, 49-69.
6.  Graham, S. (1982).  Measurement of Handwriting Skills:  A Critical Review.  
Diagnostique, 8, 32-42.
7.  Graham, S. (1992).  Issues in Handwriting Instruction.  
Focus on Exceptional Children, 25, (2).
8.  Graham, S., Harris, K. R. & Fink, B. (2000).  Is Handwriting Causally Related to Learning to Write?  
Educational Psychology, 92,
(4), 620-633.
9.  Graham, S., Harris, K. R., & Larsen, L. (2001).  Prevention & Intervention of Writing Difficulties for Students with Learning
Disabilities.  
Learning Disabilities Reserach & Practice, 16, (2), 74-84.
10. Jones & Christensen (1999).  Relationships Between Automaticity in Handwriting and Students' Ability to Generate Written
Text,
Journal of Educational Psychology, 91 (1), 44-49.
11.  Medwell, J. & Wray, D. (2008).  Handwriting - A Forgotten Language Skill?  
Language and Education, 22 (1), 34-47.
12.  Moore, R. L., & Rust, J.O. (1989).  Printing Errors in the Prediction of Academic Performance.  
Journal of School Psychology,
27 (3), 297-300.
13.  Rosenbloom, L. & Horton, M. (1971).  The Maturation of Fine Prehension in Young Children.  
Developmental Medicine & Child
Neurology,
13, 3-8.
14.  Rubin, N. & Henserson, S.E. (1982).  Two Sides of the Same Coin:  Variations in Teaching Methods and Failure to Learn to
Write.  
Special Education Forward Trends, 9 (4), 17-24.
15.  Sheffield, B. (1996).  Handwriting:  A Neglected Cornerstone of Literacy.  
Annals of Dyslexia, 46 (1), 21-35.
16.  Simner, M. (1982).  Printing Errors in Kindergarten and the Prediction of Academic Performance.  
Journal of Learning
Disabilities,
15 (3), 155-159.
17.  Stein, M., Dixon, R.C., Isaacson, S. (1994).  Effective Writing Instruction for Diverse Learners.  
School Psychology Review, 23
(3), 392-406.
18.  Tseng, M. H. & Chow, M. K. (1999).  Perceptual-Motor Function of School Age Children with Slow Handwriting Speed.  
AJOT,
54 (1), 83-88.
19. Whiteman, et. al., (1981),
Writing:  The Nature, Development, & Teaching of Written Communication, National Institute of
Education (U.S.), SWRL Education Research & Development Laboratory, Published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Is handwriting intervention
important academically?
Cost effective

Re-usable
materials
- no
workbooks to buy
annually.

Both new and
experienced
teachers
have
used "I Can Do It!"
®
successfully.

Helpful tools for
RTI
- Assessment,
Intervention &
Progress monitoring.

Handwriting &
written language
goals
are combined
within Program.

Preschool,
Kindergarten,
Grade 1
instructional
sequences -
 
combined in the
General
Instructional
Sequence for
Beginner Writers.

This is basically a
continuous
"curriculum map"
Pre-K through G1.

Students with
poor handwriting
,
and special needs
students, can be
instructed using
same sequence or
more individualized
Developmental
Sequences
method.

Appropriate for all
ages
, adaptations
for special needs
and diverse learning
styles provided.

Fewer
prerequisite skills

are needed to begin
teaching with "I Can
Do It!"
® as basic
skills and
vocabulary are
directly taught.
Note from Author & Disclaimer
© 2008 Joan Scanlon-Dise, OTR. All rights reserved.
I Can Do It Handwriting  Little Falls, NY
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Author:
Joan Scanlon-Dise,
OTR
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Sept 2011 CouncilGram
article on
3-year
Kindergarten Study
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and Clinical
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Grade 1
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FREE Tools!
Hand Development Rubric
Prone Extension Rubric
Supine Flexion Rubric
* Parent Questionnaire
FREE!  Great for RTI
Quick Assessment Rubric for Writing
Score-able
Letter REVERSALS:  Worry or Not?