Parents
If you are searching for information on handwriting, you most likely have a child who will soon be ready to learn to
write, or who is writing but experiencing some difficulty.  If your child is either a regular education or special needs
student, you have come to the right place!  
The "I Can Do It!"® Manuscript Handwriting Program is designed to help meet these needs!
"I Can Do It!"®

Is fun for all ages!  
Kids love it!

Enjoyable to teach

Provides 30 years
of handwriting teaching
experience at your fingertips!

Has been successfully used
by parents
with great results!

Works to prevent or resolve
common handwriting problems

Provides a step-by-step
sequence
to teach beginner
writers, with easy to understand
lesson plans to follow
.

Provides a method to quickly
& easily screen students
who
are struggling with writing speed,
quality, fatigue, and other
difficulties and a way to "fix" these
problems.

Provides behavior "tricks"
to keep students motivated.

Provides helpful guidance on
pencil grip, posture, and other
areas of concern.

Provides equipment that
adapts to needs
of different ages and skills of
students.

The manual is written in
understandable
everyday language,
not teacher "jargon."
Does handwriting really
matter, anyway?
Yes!

Handwriting is crucial skill for academic
success.
(* 16, 11)

Poor hand writers get lower grades.
(* 14, 15)

The development of written language
development
(composing) is negatively
impacted by handwriting difficulty, well into
the teenage years. (* 4)

Students will more likely become skilled
writers
(composers) if they receive
instruction that enables them to write letters
quickly and accurately.  (* 8, 4)

The percentage of students with
handwriting problems is highly
significant
- reported 10-34%, higher in
urban areas (44%)  (* 13)

Learning to write complex and coherent
written text requires
that students first
master  handwriting with quality and speed.
(* 4)

Studies have found that composition
improvement occurs
as a direct result of
improving handwriting. (* 8, 4)

Development of mental abilities and
critical thinking skill
is aided by writing (* 3,
19), and writing remains the way students
communicate their knowledge of subjects in
school. (* 6)

Handwriting is used as a source of
"extra memory"
for planning when
composing (*2), as they jot down ideas and
notes.

During over half of the school day
students are writing. (* 18)

Prediction of later academic success can
be made using letter formation errors.  
(* 16, 12)

Slow or unreadable writing negatively
affects
many high school and college
students in completion of school work. (* 15)

Special needs students can learn to
write,
if teachers realize they are capable
and expect them to learn. (* 9)

"I Can Do It!"® has been successfully
used to teach students who failed to
learn using the traditional methods used
in schools.
Question?
Contact the
Author
WELCOME to "I Can Do It!"® Handwriting!
Your source for effective tools to test and teach
manuscript handwriting
Note from Author & Disclaimer
© 2008 Joan Scanlon-Dise, OTR. All rights reserved.
I Can Do It Handwriting  Little Falls, NY
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Author:
Joan Scanlon-Dise,
OTR
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Program in
Action
* Some relevant citations: (noted above)

1.  Berninger, et. al., (1997).  Treatment of Handwriting Problems in Beginning Writers:  Transfer from Handwriting to
Composition.  
Journal of Educational Psychology, 89 (4), 652-666.
2.  Berninger (1999).  Coordinating Transcription and Text Generation in Working Memory during Composing:  Automatic and
Constructive Processes.  
Learning Disability Quarterly, 22 (2), 99-112.
3.  Bourdin & Fayol (2000), Is Graphic Activity Costly?  A Developmental Approach.  
Reading and Writing:  An Interdisciplinary
Journal,
13: 183-196.
4.  Connelly et.al., (2005).  The Slow Handwriting of Undergraduate Students Constrains Overall Performance in Exam Essay.  
Educational Psychology, 25 (1), 99-107.
5.  Graham, et. al., (2008).  
How do Primary Grade Teachers Teach Handwriting?  A National Survey.  Published online:  22 May
2007. Copyright Springer Science & Business Media B. V. 2007
Read Writ 21, 49-69.
6.  Graham, S. (1982).  Measurement of Handwriting Skills:  A Critical Review.  
Diagnostique, 8, 32-42.
7.  Graham, S. (1992).  Issues in Handwriting Instruction.  
Focus on Exceptional Children, 25, (2).
8.  Graham, S., Harris, K. R. & Fink, B. (2000).  Is Handwriting Causally Related to Learning to Write?  
Educational Psychology, 92,
(4), 620-633.
9.  Graham, S., Harris, K. R., & Larsen, L. (2001).  Prevention & Intervention of Writing Difficulties for Students with Learning
Disabilities.  
Learning Disabilities Reserach & Practice, 16, (2), 74-84.
10. Jones & Christensen (1999).  Relationships Between Automaticity in Handwriting and Students' Ability to Generate Written
Text,
Journal of Educational Psychology, 91 (1), 44-49.
11.  Medwell, J. & Wray, D. (2008).  Handwriting - A Forgotten Language Skill?  
Language and Education, 22 (1), 34-47.
12.  Moore, R. L., & Rust, J.O. (1989).  Printing Errors in the Prediction of Academic Performance.  
Journal of School Psychology,
27 (3), 297-300.
13.  Rosenbloom, L. & Horton, M. (1971).  The Maturation of Fine Prehension in Young Children.  
Developmental Medicine & Child
Neurology,
13, 3-8.
14.  Rubin, N. & Henserson, S.E. (1982).  Two Sides of the Same Coin:  Variations in Teaching Methods and Failure to Learn to
Write.  
Special Education Forward Trends, 9 (4), 17-24.
15.  Sheffield, B. (1996).  Handwriting:  A Neglected Cornerstone of Literacy.  
Annals of Dyslexia, 46 (1), 21-35.
16.  Simner, M. (1982).  Printing Errors in Kindergarten and the Prediction of Academic Performance.  
Journal of Learning
Disabilities,
15 (3), 155-159.
17.  Stein, M., Dixon, R.C., Isaacson, S. (1994).  Effective Writing Instruction for Diverse Learners.  
School Psychology Review, 23
(3), 392-406.
18.  Tseng, M. H. & Chow, M. K. (1999).  Perceptual-Motor Function of School Age Children with Slow Handwriting Speed.  
AJOT,
54 (1), 83-88.
19. Whiteman, et. al., (1981),
Writing:  The Nature, Development, & Teaching of Written Communication, National Institute of
Education (U.S.), SWRL Education Research & Development Laboratory, Published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Compare to Other
Programs
Purchase
Decision-Making
Link to:
nyscoss.org
NYS Council of School
Superintendents
Sept 2011 CouncilGram
article on
3-year
Kindergarten
Study
See Blog Posting

Your Child’s Pencil
Grasp - Does it
Matter How he
Holds his Pencil?
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Hand Development Rubric
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* Parent Questionnaire
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Quick Assessment Rubric for Writing
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Letter Reversals - Worry or Not?